Music Talk with Derek Post

Derek Post is a singer/songwriter hailing from Louisiana with a lot to say. Being from the South, Derek has incorporated the classical blues compositions of his corner of the world into his music. With advanced guitar techniques and warming vocals, Derek’s music encapsulates the true roots of R&B, combining contemporary elements to make for a refreshingly new sound.

 “There were a few factors that influenced my sound and identity as an artist. My Dad was a guitar player and my mom shared his musical tastes. My parents are close in age so generationally they come from the same music. When you grow up living under your parents roof, you are exposed to the music they listen to one way or another. I remember my mom and I would (& still do) play the ‘name that artist or song’ game on the radio, so music was around in many forms you see. It was this constant absorption over time that I retained, though I wasn’t aware.”
When Derek moved to attend college in South Dakota his interest in music was piqued, brining with him the musical styles that surrounded him as a child. His father was a blues guitarist in a few bands and his mother would sometimes run sound for their shows. I wanted to know what sparked Derek’s initial drive to recognize his musical talents as a career rather than a hobby or creative outlet.
“I don’t believe there was any epiphany regarding music as a living, breathing career for me. When I started playing I had a passion for it and was having fun learning and growing musically, not conscious that playing music was becoming my job. They mutually exclusive. Gradually it began to seem natural to take the next step to pursue music professionally.”
Like any great musician and artist, Derek not only focuses on his own music but continues to cover classic songs by iconic artists. I questioned if playing covers or originals was more rewarding or cathartic than the other.
“There is a difference,” Derek explained.  “Playing your own songs can obviously have more personal meaning  and depth for you. When you write the music & lyrics you have more connection to the song. However, I love playing covers of my favorite artists. It’s partly how I learned to play,” he went on. “Discovering a new favorite song, learning it by ear and being able to play it, hopefully doing it justice, is always a fun process that never gets old. This process is two-fold by virtue of learning a new song, but also new chords, techniques, and ideas, that can be applied to your own playing. All of my favorite artists played covers back in the day.”
As a songwriter with a myriad of influences, his favorite song at the moment being “I Can’t Make You Love Me” by Bonnie Raitt, it is interesting to hear Derek’s music and confer the root of what sparked his inspiration. Most songwriters don’t follow necessary steps to write new material because the process comes organically. Derek further proved this concept when we spoke.
“I don’t have a formulaic process but there are a few ways that I like best. One way is mostly fractal; vocal melodies, guitar riffs, or drum beats can spontaneously come to me and I have to do my best to translate the pieces to a recording,” Derek said. “The other way is; I like playing bass & drums, creating and recording a groove or a scratch track to start with. From there, I can sing and play guitar over the track until something is worth pursuing. A lot of mumbling and jamming but it’s fun to just let go,” he laughed. “You have to trust your instincts. Once I have the melodies I add the lyrical content, which is derived from experiences I’ve had, am currently having, or could in the future.”
“Major personal influences would be my parents. They have shaped me with invaluable lessons, advice, & wisdom that I hope to pass on when I have kids one day. My dads musical influences, influenced me. He introduced me to artist’s that most impacted him and set a foundation for me musically. When I began to play guitar I was introduced via my dad, to my first influences; Cream, Albert King and Hendrix. I gained an intangible from these artists that can’t be taught, about feeling & soul that will always be apart of my playing,” Derek spoke about his influences both personally and musically. “Over time I began to sing and expand my musical horizon with singers & songwriters such as; Smokey Robinson,The Band, Stevie Wonder, James Brown, Steve Windwood; all whom I attained a musical education from.”
Derek is releasing a new EP that he’s more than excited to share with his ever-growing audience.
Ebb & The Flow is the album title; it is meant to describe the outgoing & incoming or high & low phases of the tide. Universally everything ebbs & flows. Emotions, relationships, careers, the stock market,” he expanded, ” they’re all constantly fluctuating. If you think about the highest high & the lowest low (which is subject to change) of your life, you live in between these places, in between the high & the low, in between the ebb & the flow.”
Derek’s poetic explanation of his album is only a small preview to the illustrations that are sure to come to a listener with every song. Art comes in many forms. Painting, writing, sculpting, playing the piano, or dancing – to name a few. Each of those art forms depicts a sense of self and storytelling in a different light. Some you can tangibly see and some you must search for. Derek is the type of artist that provides his listeners with a product, universal enough for everyone to find their own truth behind his story. You can’t hold his music in your hands, but you can feel it in your heart and at the end of the day, the truth in the unseen is what his audience makes of it.
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